Tuberculosis on Film: Free talk and screening of The Lucky Specials


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In advance of the first-ever, United Nations High-Level Meeting on Tuberculosis (TB), on September 26, 2018 the Office of Global Public Health Education and Training at the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, Toronto Public Health and the Greater Toronto Area volunteers of RESULTS Canada are pleased to present a free talk and screening of The Lucky Specials, a South African feature-length film that poignantly sheds light on the devastating impact of TB infection. Mandla (Oros Mampofu) works as a miner by day but is passionate about playing guitar and dreams of making it big in the music industry. When tragedy strikes, Mandla, his friend Nkanyiso (Sivenathi Mabuya) and the band must find the strength to make their dreams a reality.

Join us on Thursday, September 13 to learn more about TB, the Canadian response and the historic UN meeting that must result in strengthened actions and increased investments if we are to end the global TB epidemic by 2030.

Evening Program:

5:30 Doors open – Registration and Networking

6:00 Opening Remarks by Dr. Xiaolin Wei, Associate Professor, Dalla Lana School of Public Health & Secretary General, Board of Directors of the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease and Dr. Elizabeth Rea, Associate Medical Officer of Health, Toronto Public Health

7:00 Film screening

8:45 Closing remarks – TB Patient Advocate

The Office of Global Public Health Education and Training is the knowledge hub of global health educational activities at DLSPH and views global health in an integrative manner. Its programs focus on the relationships among local, regional, national, and international forces that influence health and health equity as well as on the development of effective interventions and policies.

The Tuberculosis Program at Toronto Public Health works with health professionals and the community to reduce the incidence and impact of TB in Toronto and to provide support for individuals with TB and their families.

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